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Help Your Network Pay Attention to Your Career

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Our careers exist in the context of that intricate web of family, friends and colleagues that we call our network.

I've often drawn an analogy between that network, as an organism of sorts, and our own brains. For example, when our brains make more robust connections, our network of cells becomes "smarter." Likewise, we become more adept at things that we use our brain connections for and our network becomes more adept as we use the connections we've created.

In the same way that we as project professionals are bombarded by an overwhelming number of stimuli, so too is our professional network. And likewise, the network can only take notice of a very small number of things. The majority of what it encounters simply has to be ignored.

I previously wrote about how we can sensitize the part of our brains called the Reticular Activating System (RAS) to help us achieve career objectives. If the above the analogy holds up (and I think it does), we should be able to sensitize our network to help us advance our project management careers in the same way that we can sensitize our own minds.

Simply setting a goal mentally sensitizes the mind to events that can help us achieve that goal. Similarly, articulating a goal to our network, especially in writing, sensitizes our peers' minds, creating spots of sensitivity within the network. The network becomes sensitized and can attribute new meaning to the same stuff that has been happening all around it. All of a sudden, everything seems to become aligned to your purpose.

For example, if you tell your professional network that you are looking for job, it becomes something your peers are aware of. When they see an open project management position, rather than skip over it, they think of your job search.

As a participating member of this network, you can work with others to sensitize your mind to their purpose. You will pay attention to things that you otherwise would have ignored that will help you to help them achieve their career goals.

As I have often said, networking is a generous activity. When you give without thinking of getting, you will find that the network gives back more than what you put in. Don't doubt it! Not for a moment.

How have you benefitted from your network?

 

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2 Comments

Indeed it does. We live in a world where if you don't exist on the social networks you don't exist at all. A PM can use social networks for more than just exchanging information and knowledge, it could be a good method to know your resources and whats going on in your project surroundings beyond 9 to 5.

The PMP designation can help a professional project manager to get recognition from his employer and clients. But a project manager needs to upgrade his skills on a constant basis through continuous learning and resources.

When a project manager is busy in his professional responsibilities, he hardly finds the time to upgrade his skills. Therefore, networking with fellow project managers and other professionals is the only way to acquire new project management techniques and practices.

The online social networks have also made it much more convenient for project managers to expand their career by networking with other professionals.

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